Processions

SORROW’S FRIDAY

SOLEMN STATIONS OF THE CROSS

Vía Crucis Jumilla Cristo Perdón

PRESIDE OVER

Santísimo Cristo del Perdón.

ITINERARY

Santiago’s Church (South Door), Santiago Street, Arriba Square, Salvador Pérez de los Cobos, San Roque, Constitución Square, Cánovas del Castillo, Pasos, Canalejas and El Salvador’s Church.

TIMETABLE

Dolores’ Friday at half past nine in the evening, from Santiago’s Church.

PASOS AND STATIONS

  • I. Beso de Judas
  • II. Negación de San Pedro
  • III. Cristo Humillado
  • IV. Jesús ante Herodes
  • V. Cristo de la Sentencia
  • VI. Cristo de la Caída
  • VII. Cristo de la Misericordia
  • VIII. La Verónica
  • IX. Virgen del Primer Dolor
  • X. Santa María Magdalena
  • XI. Cristo de la Expiración
  • XII. Cristo de la Salud
  • XIII. Virgen de la Piedad
  • XIV. Guarda del Cuerpo de Cristo

HISTORICAL REVIEW

It was created in 1994 by the Central Board of Brotherhoods, with Mr. Joaquín Valero Sánchez as president. Brotherhoods, during the Dolores’ Friday afternoon, have their pasos at altars prepared for that, in a perfect surrounding for it passes during the Station of the Cross evening, and it is presided over by one of the images of Cristo Crucificado of every one that is taking part on Easter. Neighbours actively cooperate with Board with the adornment of different stations of penance.

Itinerary Solemn  Stations  Cross

PROCESSIONAL MOVING

Saturday of Passion

Moving  Prendido Virgen Lamentaciones

PROCESSIONAL MOVING OF JESUS PRENDIDO, SAN JUAN, DOLOROSA DE LAS LAMENTACIONES, CORONACIÓN DE ESPINAS AND ECCE-HOMO

ITINERARY

Moving of the images Jesús Prendido and San Juan, from Church of Santiago, La Coronación de Espinas and La Dolorosa de las Lamentaciones from the Museum of Semana Santa, having the encounter at the Hermitage of San Roque, where after the ceremonial Encounter, it is started its processional moving.

Image de Jesús Prendido.

Miguel Trigueros and Salvador Pérez de los Cobos and San Roque.

Image de San Juan.

South door of Church of Santiago, Cuesta Caballo, Santa María, Salzillo, alley La Palmera and San Roque.

Image de la Virgen de las Lamentaciones.

San Antón, San Roque.

Image de la Coronación de Espinas.

San Antón, Infante D. Fadrique and Portillo de los Milanos.Moving of Cristo Ecce-Homo, from church of San Juan, which will join to formers at the corner of Cánovas and Pasos.

Image del Ecce Homo. 

San José Avenue, Calvario, Pasos, Cánovas, Murcia Avenue, Portillo de la Glorieta, chapel of the confraternity El Rollo.

TIMETABLE

Saturday at nine o’clock in the evening, from church of Santiago.

IMAGES

  • Jesús Prendido
  • San Juan
  • Virgen de las Lamentaciones
  • Coronación de Espinas
  • Ecce-Homo

Holy Monday

PROCESSIONAL MOVING OF CRISTO DE LA COLUMNA

Moving  cristo Jumilla

ITINERARY

Santiago north door, Cuatro Cantones, Santa María, Castelar, Constitución Square, Cánovas, Pasos, Levante Avenue, Barón del Solar, Chapel of the Brotherhood of Cristo.

TIMETABLE

At eleven o’clock in the morning, from Church of Santiago.
Moving from Church of Santiago, of the venerated image of Cristo de la Columna, accompanied by the Jumilla’s children.

IMAGES

  • Cristo Amarrado a la Columna

PROCESSIONAL MOVING SANTÍSIMO CRISTO DE LA REJA

Moving Cristo Reja Jumilla

ITINERARY

Monastery of Santa Ana, Santa Ana road, Hermitage of San Agustín, Asunción Avenue, Cánovas, Rollo Square, Pío XII, Church of San Juan Bautista.

TIMETABLE

At half past eight in the evening.
Reception of the image Santísimo Cristo de La Reja at the Hermitage of San Agustín, an exceptional and venered work from the 17th century, of unknown author, and subsequent moving to the Church of San Juan Bautista.

IMAGES

  • Santísimo Cristo de la Reja

PALMS’ SUNDAY

Palms’ Procession

 Palms  Proccesion Jumilla

ITINERARY

San Juan’s Church, Pío XII, Rollo Square, Cánovas, Constitución Square, Castelar, Santa María, Cuatro Cantones to finish at Santiago’s Church (North Door).

TIMETABLE

Palms’ Sunday at twelve o’clock in the morning. From San Juan Bautista’s Church.

HISTORICAL REVIEW

It is known that this first parade of Easter was done, organised by the old Brotherhood Jesús Nazareno, from the origins of this group, in the middle of 19th century, although it is easy to imagine that it may have been realised a lot of time before, encouraged by Franciscans of the dissappeared Las Llagas’ Convent.

From one end to the other end of town, from east to west, the cheerful and multitudinous entourage will fill the streets of the urban longitudinal axis. Under archs with tidied up fabrics, it will stop the group of extras of apostles with their white, curved and swaying palm leaves. Lord, on a donkey, will declain those ragged verses: ‘¡Oh ciudad noble y leal // en tiempos la más dichosa…! ‘Y el sol destellará en los ramos rizados, en las cintas con lazos, en los cochecitos de los recién nacidos con su palmica, en los vestidos nuevos, en las colchas de los arcos, en las altas y gráciles palmas.
Buzz, bugles, music.
It already is, at last, Easter Week.
Text: José Tévar García

Itinerary Palms' Procession

Reception Cristo Amarrado a la Columna

recibimiento cristo Jumilla

ITINERARY

Asunción Avenue, Cánovas, Constitución Square, San Roque, Salvador Pérez de Los Cobos, Arriba Square, Santiago Street, Santiago’s Church South Door.

TIMETABLE

At nine o’clock in the evening. Reception of the image Cristo Amarrado a la Columna at San Agustín’s Chapel and move to Santiago’s Church. Itinerary  Reception  Cristo Santa Ana

HOLY TUESDAY

Silence’s Procession. Penitencial Procession of the Cristo de la Vida

Silence's Procession Jumilla

ITINERARY

Santiago’s Church (South Door going around the atrium for leaving through the North Door or del Perdón), Cuatro Cantones, Santa María, Cuesta del Cura, Santiago, Arriba Square, Salvador Pérez de los Cobos, San Roque, Constitución Square, Amargura, Calvario, Cabecico Square, Cabecico, Amargura Crossing, Cruces, Miguel Trigueros for finishing in Santiago’s Chuch, through its North door.

TIMETABLE

Tuesday at half past eleven at night – PENITENTIAL CELEBRATION.
Holy Tuesday at midnight – SILENCE’S PROCESSION.

BROTHERHOODS

Santísimo Cristo de la Vida
Ntra. Señora de la Esperanza

HISTORICAL REVIEW

The Penitential Procession of the Cristo de la Vida was created in 1971 for replacing the former Silence’s Procession which went in the early morning of Good Friday and that had disappeared in 1965.Long rows of penitents with large candles and crosses accompany the Santísimo Cristo de la Vida and Nuestra Señora de la Esperanza.

Under the Gothic domes of Santiago, in front of the splendid and illuminated altarpiece, it is being developed a ritual of penance, prior to procession. Images, on their thrones, are on presbitery; in the nave crosses are raised which, penitents dressed in black, will carry on their shoulders during the route.

Large doors are opened, a drum resounds with echo, a blue incense cloud is spread in the area. And the misterious and solemn procession of Holy Tuesday, in the early morning, will go across dark and convoluted streets, steep steps, curves, little squares illuminated by sparkling bonfires and large candles, with resounding chains dragged by the asphalt, a hollow drum, chorus polyphony, the hammer of platform…

Slow walk the raised crucifix of the royal standard, the banners, the bell jars with candles, the beadles, the rows of hooded people with their crosses on one’s back, their candles burning, before the acolytes appear, among incense, and the pasos: the great Crucified’s on their branches of flickering waxes, and the Mother’s, painful of Hope, among lamps, surrounded by her hooded women.
Devoted audience, expectant or curious by the ancient streets, under full moon. The wind or breeze extinguish the candles and shake the people, in the murmuring sleepless night and in shadow.

Texto: José Tévar García Itinerary Silence's Procession  Jumilla

HOLY WEDNESDAY

The Capture

The Capture  Jumilla

PLACE

At its traditional location Arriba Square.

TIMETABLE

Holy Wednesday at half past five in the afternoon.

HISTORICAL REVIEW

In the Holy Wednesday afternoon, as preface of the Jesús Prendido’s Procession, it is traditionally being celebrated, from the second half of the 19th century, the representation of the sacred play: ‘The Capture’.The work is a religious play of eight scenes, written in easy verse, which starts in the hall of the Caifás Council, and finishes in the Pretorio after Pilatos’ sentence. In the representation traditionally takes part the Tercio de Armaos of the Brotherhood of Cristo.
The actors are city’s neighbours directed by Mr. Eugenio Aguado and Mr. Miguel García.
In the past, it was represented in the facade of the disentailed Convent de Las Cinco Llagas.

Since more than a century and a half, that we know, every Holy Wednesday afternoon outdoors, it is realised a theatre performance, in a popular key, versified – according to the fashion of the late Romanticism, and a very easy set design, of The Capture and Lord’s Trial.
In front of the wonderful Renaissance facade that presides the Arriba Square, on top of a stage adorned with palm’s and olive tree’s branches.
The Sanedrinistas, the Judaism’s clergy, will gather in conspiracy; at Gethsemane, Lord will be tempted by Lucifer, with long parley; He will be conforted by Angels with a catchy jazz; He will be betrayed by Judas, who will end in dramatic desperation; He will go across religious and civil courts in the Israel of that time: dressed in white tunic of madman by Herod, tortured and condemned to death by Pilates with a mocking maundy, and driven prisoner among sound of trumpets, drums and children jubilation by the city’s streets.
Reminder and lesson, The Capture is one of the most popular and loved rituals of our Easter Week. The Holy Wednesday afternoon of a clear springtime can not be imagined in our city without this put in scene of the Christ tragedy’s first chapter: the power conspiracy in front of who oppose it; the dying anguish -in his solitude- awaring of the torture, and its efficacy doubt, symbolised in Lucifer; betrayal, denunciation and friends’ cowardice; the trial-farce; hypocrisy, cynicism and the leaders’ ruthless cruelty… And Lord, determined faced with an enormous moral importance’s commitment, forever.

Texto: José Tévar García

Jesús Prendido Procession

Miércoles Santo Jumilla

ITINERARY

Salvador’s Church, Canalejas, Esteban Tomás, San Roque, Constitución Square, Cánovas, Verónica, Canalejas for ending at Salvador’s Church.

TIMETABLE

Holy Wednesday at ten o’clock at night. From Salvador’s Church.

BROTHERHOODS

  • La Samaritana
  • Unción de Jesús en Betania
  • Santa Cena
  • Oración del Huerto
  • Beso de Judas
  • Jesús Prendido
  • Negación de San Pedro
  • Jesús ante Herodes
  • San Juan Apóstol
  • Ntra. Señora del Primer Dolor

HISTORICAL REVIEW

It was created in the second half of the 19th century inside bosom of the Confraternity Nuestro Padre Jesús Nazareno, by its president Mr. Roque Molera.

Around the ‘losado’, under the twin towers of Salvador’s Church, the illuminated night is an uproar of Nazarenes, musicians, standards, romans helmets, anchored pasos waiting to form the procession.
The straight street Loreto -Canalejas in placards- bubbles.
Cross guide, music, drums, high hoods, and the sweet brilliance of The Samaritan woman, among lampshades, the baroque style of its golds, the olive tree shaking its branches, shiny jug on the woman’s hip, gathering up her cape with rococo grace, the well with its rope and its ancient skin, The Lord seated nearby the parapet, his hands extended…
Gleams in the metal of the insignias; the tablecloth of Lazarus’ house, the great frontal table of the Supper, the spectacular Angel of the Prayer in the Mount, with its Christ postrated on his knees at the foot of the olive tree; silver tendrils with glass and wax flowers at the Gethsemane of the Judas’ betrayal; flickering candles behind the crystalware of the paso of Jesús Prendido; velvets and music from the Confraternity El Rollo, the swinging rythm of the women walking while supporting the richness of the throne La Negagión, and the Herodes’ jamuga on its footstool with alcatifa, pointing at the tied Lord, the bailiff with turban and ancient scimitar with the white tunic of mockery.
It passes, over bronze eagles, the extended arm and the San Juan’s curly palmón. La Madre del Primer Dolor looks to the eaves, to the balconies, to the Holy Wednesday early morning sky, closed by the astonished singing of the San Pedro’s cock, weepy under the reappeared fig tree, among the golden algae of its throne.
On the way back, by El Rollo, the night dew hurries the parade of the last music band, of the priest with purple cope cape, and the crosses with light bulbs fall asleep by the cool breeze.

Texto: José Tévar García Itinerary Jesús Prendido Procession

HOLY THURSDAY

Visit to The Monuments. The Manolas

The  manolas Holy Thursday  Jumilla

TIMETABLE

Holy Thursday from half past five in the afternoon.

MONUMENTS TO VISIT

  • Santa Teresa Jornet Residence for the Elderly
  • Santiago’s Church
  • Salvador’s Church
  • San Juan Bautista’s Church

HISTORICAL REVIEW

In 1928, booming the brotherhoods of San Pedro and Santa María Magdalena, they started the processions in the Holy Thursday afternoon with the aim of attend in full to the services. The nazarenes, accompanied in the way by their music bands, are dressed in tunics, and ladies wear the traditional spanish mantilla. Nowadays takes part the majority of brotherhoods in the visit of Monuments and prayer of the services.

Bells sounding in the luminous evening: from Santiago, serious and solemn ones; from Salvador, singers; from the nursing home and the Dominicas, with white voices, childlike ones.
In groups, in pairs with nazarenes at the arm, fragrant women, the black lace over maroon at the Spring chest, they walk towards center, to the Feria Street, already whole vibrating of sun, of scents, of bar’s hubbub.
Under the Town Hall hangings, will walk the Brotherhoods’ retinues, enjoyable, trembling of marchs; at the front, wounded of sun, its embroiderings and silvers, the standard, and behind it, the music band of brilliant instruments, polished, and nazarenes and women of mantilla, their clicks and their flower in burst in the mourning and turgid chest. The public claps, the music opens in an jubilation effusiveness, and The Lord is already in the beauty of the maroon velvet Monuments, of large candles and of white palm’s leaves, but -above all- in its people’s heart, because today, it is a great day for meeting in Jumilla, queen in the new joy and young of its children.

Texto: José Tévar García

Amargura Procession

Jueves Santo Jumilla

ITINERARY

Santa María, Castelar, Salvador Pérez de los Cobos, San Roque, Constitución Square, Cánovas, Cura Abellán, Canalejas and ending at Salvador’s Church.

TIMETABLE

Holy Thursday at ten o’clock in the evening, from Santa María’s Church.

BROTHERHOODS

  • Cristo Humillado
  • Santísimo Cristo de la Columna
  • Coronación de Espinas
  • Ecce-Homo
  • Santísimo Cristo de la Sentencia
  • Santísimo Cristo de la Caída
  • Cristo de la Misericordia
  • Jesús se encuentra con las Hijas de Jerusalén
  • Jesús de Pasión
  • La Verónica
  • Jesús Nazareno
  • Virgen de la Amargura

HISTORICAL REVIEW

15th century (1411), when it is founded the Confraternity El Rosario (by the Vicente Ferrer’s preaching, dominico), whose corporation organised a flagellants’ procession every Holy Thursday.

In the middle of the Loreto Street, the Salvador’s ‘losado’, as a high rostrum of ashlar, -ramp, stairway and wall-, dominates. The Holy Thursday early morning has been revealed high, and the strokes of midnight, of the one in the morning, from the baroque towers of the temple, have fallen diluted over the majestic marchs of music and the trumpets of the ‘armaos’. From the ‘losado’, the perspective of the unsteady lights approaching slowly, swinging, moving away towards the depth of the street among hoods and the shine of the shafts, puts ellipsis to the view of the pasos that, flowing at the level of the spectators heads leant out of the wall, illuminated by bell glasses and wax candelabrum, show its plasticity.

The Magdalene, on the high base, walks to the Golgotha with her scent bottle, The Amarrado, with his purples, his silvers, the executioners buckthorns, Column’s Lord, love and heart of his people, drags penances, tears, leggings and fringes of the ‘armaos’, the macebearer, the longino on horseback, the drum roll, the bugles. Meanwhile, the lights bunches of the Ecce-Homo have already turned at the end, distant, of the street, and the Coronation has reached the wall, swayed by its maroon hoods, trembling of music and wax. The Rollo is coming, unequalled confraternity, murmuring, between the redish of its lanterns and its velvets: standards, horns, vergers with high faces, band’s French horns and drums, and the throne with its soft swinging, majesty of its tied Christ, crowned, oscillating the tassel of its cords, aristocratic and arrogant Pilatos, elegant Roman, of helmet and spear, all between the light’s inflorescences of its wavy glassware candelabrum. The Sentence. Among big matt lanterns, the Christ stands stiff of torture, over the tanned richness of its base. The Caída advances with a sweet swinging. The Lord, under the cross, tries to rest his hand, and he has looked at us with his sad eyes, reflecting the lanterns flames. Among iris, on the other side of the base crowded of saints, two children cry standing, and show to the city -who can not see from there the Lord’s face- the cloth of the Holy Face. The Christ of Mercy advances dragging his embroidered tunic, the long cross to the shoulder, over an iris’ field, between foliages of candles with little crowns, the attentive Cirinean, rhythmic, glinted the lemon gold of its throne, over the whiteness and red of its walker. It moves away the capes and hoods of Nazarenes, the embroidered standards, the caps and instruments of bands, the Christs’ backs, the thrones… And already the whole street is of the Nazarene: black and maroon velvets, cross of gold and mirrors, silvery lanterns, drums uproar, embroidered flag, the stir of children in groups already weary, standards; at the top of dressed poles, large medals with paintings, dalmatian, incense. The Passion’s Christ is coming between silvery lanterns and purple wax, bobbing its tunic and its cross, shuddering its power, The Mother on its knees, bitter, San Juan bowed to her, shining his halo. Bear their griefs silent and hooded women. The Veronica. Sumptuousness of the standar, of the throne of convoluted points, embossing small vases, lampshades’ stems with blue wax. The cloth is ivory lace, rolling it up the breeze. A standing statue in a trance of Salzillo, is outlined high to the black crystal of the night. It is moving away slow, in the sweet dance of its walkers. It is coming the standard of pebbles of Our Father, the embroidered banners and of ancient damask, the music band with a solemn march, trumpets with embroidery finery, luxury tunics, and the Book of Rules in purifier of brocade, the raised cross, the children with striking maroon dresses, the small bells’ tinkle, acolytes in an incense fog… And in the refulgent ship of gold and angels, among the jingle of its lights, Jesus the Nazarene, raised in the majesty of his vessel, overflowing the purple tunic, with the enormous cross of shell, the lilies in goldsmithing vases.

The glory of the procession arrives to its zenith, The Amargura’s Mother, between the sweet music and scents, illuminated by the dim light of its argentine candles, approaching crowned, under the mantle of embroidered riches, fastened in its crossed hands, the scarf of lace of its tears, shed the mantle of golden flora, queen of the lyric dream of Easter Week.

In the latter route, quiet of the last streets of procession, I have followed you hypnotised by your beauty, in the silence or music that lulls you, between the myrrh’s scent, Amargura’s Mother. And other year’s days, at closing my eyes, I will recall your magical path in the high early hours of Holy Thursdays.

Texto: José Tévar García Itinerary Amargura Procession

GOOD FRIDAY

Calvary’s Procession

Calvary's Procession  Jumilla

ITINERARY

Pasos, Calvario, Cruces, Miguel Trigueros, Acomodadas, Gastos Square, Santa María, Castelar, Salvador Pérez de los Cobos, San Roque, Constitución Square, Cánovas, Canónigo Lozano, Canalejas and finishing in Salvador’s Church.

TIMETABLE

Good Friday at eleven o’clock in the morning, from Salvador’s Church.

BROTHERHOODS

  • La Samaritana
  • Unción de Jesús en Betania
  • Oración del Huerto
  • Beso de Judas
  • Jesús Prendido
  • Jesús ante Herodes
  • Santísimo Cristo de la Columna
  • Santísimo Cristo de la Sentencia
  • Santísimo Cristo de la Caída
  • Cristo de la Misericordia
  • Nuestro Padre Jesús Nazareno del Calvario
  • Humildad y Paciencia
  • Elevación a la Cruz
  • Santo Costado de Cristo
  • Santísimo Cristo de la Salud
  • Santa María Magdalena
  • Ntra. Señora del Primer Dolor

HISTORICAL REVIEW

All the signs point to that this procession comes from the begginings of the 17th century, when the franciscans settled in the Llagas’ Convent and organised the praying of the Pasos that, at the Good Friday dawn and on the way of the Calvary (hence the names of the current streets of the ancient tour and also of the procession), they visited the station of the today streets Pasos and Pasos Altos, act to which attended the Penance’s Confraternities.

The whole city is already collected, cramped, on the long itinerary, accompanied and bustling, of the procession. The streets Loreto, Rollo, Feria, San Roque, they open their doors to the air and the radiant morning light.

The great Santiago’s Church has in its perimeter a wide slabs atrium, with an adjacent bench and a little wall of ashlar. From there, the landscape of flowery fields, reappeared, of singular outline hills, it extends to a far skyline, veiled at its deep, under the pure blue of April. Leaning at the fresh little wall by the tower shade, we see coming, slow, the magnificent procession. Illuminated by sun the Pasos of the Samaritana, Jesús en Betania, Oración en el Huerto, Beso de Judas, Jesús Prendido, Señor ante Herodes…, golds and metals sparkling, among the sounds of music, trumpets, the crowd and the nazarenes’ stir, the heavy standards, swarming of embroideries and fringes.

The Cristo de la Columna, on the silver of the throne, bloomed of carnation, under the April’s young sun, brings grown stigmata of flagellation, its injured flesh, the executioners’ ferocity. The Acomodadas’ Slope is gone up by helmets, spears, the ‘armaos’ bucklers, between the drum roll and the ancient sounds of trumpets of every single Easter Week. The Coronación laboriously sways up to the high of the slope. The Ecce-Homo appears with its trembling crown shining, and The Sentencia stops at the landing, it takes breath for reassembling the other slope, up to the tower’s base, it is pushed the throne of mahoganies worked with curly chiaroscuro. Slow swaying of The Caída. The Christ de la Misericordia, with its Cyrenian, turns and twists over a knoll of lilies kneaded by sun. And the horde black and maroon of Jesús Nazareno is spilled, raising fluorescent standards of golds, incense’s clouds, solemnity of accompanied marchs, fine tinkle of small bells.The Cristo de la Pasión sways walking toward the postrated Mother. The Verónica is already going up. The Face’s cloth flutters by the breeze, and the platforms of volutes and bunches sway, glinting the gilding of its fallen leaves. The cross, the crowns, the purple tunic, open in a flow of pleats of the Nazarene are outlined on the new green and the red of hills of the bottom. The throne boils by sun’s dazzles in the twisted sparks of the small carving. The Costado. The standard is a grille of lace in front of the course of the nazarenes of crimson, white and black. It emerges from down of the slope, the headboard of the three crosses. The Lord, collapsed in his death, among the nudes of the Thieves, tied to the simple crosses. The Mother and Juan stretch their arms in the anguish of the drama’s enigma, with their shaken robes, gleaming of embroidery silks. The spear and its horseman, in the front. Shine the crowns of silvery thorns of the throne in the slowness of their sorrow. The whole air is a drum roll, a mournful march of procession, a resounding notice of cymbals and bass drum, of boxes of music bands, of trumpets… It already advances, with a ritual’s rythm, the standard of tassels, ribs and nuanced silks of the Cristo de la Salud, cardinal Red, velvet and moiré black of their anderos backstitch the slope. They have just relieved carrying the throne, and the hammer of the platform’s corporal has done to raise, shaking it, the golden hill, of incarnate glass, flowery of the platform. The asleep Cristo de la Salud opens its arms, while a sculptural tip of the cloth of purity flies to the Calvary’s wind. Smell of incense and flowers. Purple and red of the Rollo with the Descendimiento. The Dead Lord places its cheek on the Arimatea’s forehead, an arm already untied. At the top of the Cross, Nicodemo holds, with a canvas, the injured breast of Lord. Mother and Disciple wait to hug it, devastated. María Magdalena remains on its throne, fearful, waiting with its ointment to calm the atrocious torture of the Redeemer’s flesh. Between lampshades and roses, at the top of its ancient golden base, the Mother of Sorrow only sees at the top, pale, its hands in unconscious plea, under the glorious mantle of the virgin sky.

Texto: José Tévar García

Itinerary Calvary's Procession

Santo Entierro’s Procession

Procesión del Santo Entierro Jumilla

ITINERARY

Santa María, Castelar, Pérez de los Cobos, San Roque, Constitución Square, Cánovas, Pasos, final in Calvario before starting Cruces.

TIMETABLE

Good Friday at ten o’clock in the evening, from Santa María’s Church.

BROTHERHOODS

  • Cristo de la Expiración
  • Santo Costado de Cristo
  • Santísimo Cristo de la Salud
  • Santísimo Cristo de la Reja
  • Cristo de las Cinco Llagas
  • Descendimiento de la Cruz
  • Virgen de las Angustias
  • Virgen de La Piedad
  • Las lamentaciones ante Cristo muerto
  • Traslado al Sepulcro
  • Vera Cruz
  • Santo Sepulcro
  • Santa María Magdalena
  • San Pedro Apóstol
  • San Juan Apóstol
  • Ntra. Señora de la Soledad

HISTORICAL REVIEW

The Santo Entierro’s procession, which origin is in 1609, with the founding of the Rosario’s Confraternity, more ancient than the Vera-Cruz, in charge of, until today, its processional core. It is probable that the Rosario’s Confraternity had made some similar act in the Good Friday dusk, before this date, during the 15th and 16th centuries.

Go up slow the nazarenes and the images by the Pasos slope. Full of public, the street, with the Via-Crucis chapels illuminated, it is a flow of trembling lights. The Cristo de la Expiración, in the death rattle of its anguish, rises imposing on its platform of detailed mahoganies, openwork. It stops between the stir of its anderos with white tunics and black hoods, sharp-pointed. It turns to the wide street of the Calvario, frozen stiff of night dew and moon, and the Lanzada’s throne, with its three crosses, goes up heavily, lighting up the Salvador’s walls. At bottom before the ancient pines of the Glorieta, it has faced the slope, swinging its red lanterns, the Cristo de la Salud. A drum, an only drum, marks the beat and, in the distance, the processional marchs. Rises an incense cloud that blurs the four flames of the Cinco Llagas, at the end of the theory of flags, large candles and insignias, of hooded of black with gold fringes. The great Crucified of long hairs and purple loincloth, a ladder leans on the cross, and the Mother, gone down on its knees, between coagulated roses. Its crown and its eyes shine with the torchs’ flames. Slow, swinging, the grief of the Descendimiento’s group, the polished halo of San Juan shaking. Anderos of red, in a strict escort. Branch lights of the Angustias. A bed sheet extended on the rock with the crown and the nails, pulled out from the Lord. At the foot of the cross, with finishing richness and lace shroud, the Mother holds the Lord bloodless nude. It rhythmically advances between the acolytes scented mist, after the retinue of nazarenes of black with long candles, a raised cross with a mourning cover, a spear, a sponge… The throne of silver’s petals of the Traslado al Sepulcro, between the purple of wax and flowers. The Holy men carry to the Dead Lord in a open bed sheet, with lace edging. From the Cristo’s rigid hand has fallen a blood drop, transubstantiated on pink. Slow rolling of the throne of the Lamentaciones, with large lampshades of green candles. The Recumbent Lord, supported its head on a embroidery cushion, over the shroud and the burial mound, it is wept by the Mother, San Juan, the Magdalena with its cup of scents, everybody with vestments of powerful plushes. Ewer of ancient metal and towel of long fringe for washing the Lord’s corpse.
And the Holy Sepulchre.

Standard black and tall with unfold ribbons in bend; the Vera Cruz paso, alone, among lanterns, towel of solitude at the sky of night, pending from the arms. After it, the raised Cross of radiant magnificence; pleats of ivory habit, large candles, and the Santo Sepulcro’s carriage, sailing with golden grace, with its bronze bell jar for the Recumbent Lord, injured, raised its head on pillow of rock and bed sheet, the spilled hair.

Magdalena’s anderos, cobalt blue, supporting the base of shines, of drooping lanterns, jingles; the ones of San Pedro Arrepentido, everybody maroon, with the rooster of black plumage, frozen in its kikiriki, and the San Juan’s ones, white and red, swinging the throne of silvers, candelabras and eagles. White flag, fastens in a big, metalic brooch. The manolas’ stomp, a heart with silver swords on the black breast, candle’s light butterflies in double row along the street, in silence. Distant, a mournful march, and the icy shine of the Soledad’s throne: worked silverware, white flora, quiet lights. Between the tight hands, a heart with the ancient jewel shine: openworks around its pale face, of anguished beauty; queen’s crown among dazzling rays, and the long black cape, embroidery.
Rattle of chairs, murmur of public, music and drums in the air’s horizon. The Street, alone, illuminated of crosses, under the bells of the hours of the Salvador’s clock.

Texto: José Tévar García

Itinerary Santo Entierro's Procession

HOLY SATURDAY

Redención Procession

Redención Procession  Jumilla

ITINERARY

Santiago’s Church (North Door), Cuatro Cantones, Castelar, Pérez de los Cobos, San Roque, Constitución Square, Cánovas, Pasos, finishing at Salvador’s Church.

TIMETABLE

Holy Saturday at half past six in the evening, from Santiago’s Church.

BROTHERHOODS

  • Cristo de la Redención
  • La Guarda del Cuerpo de Cristo
  • Virgen de las Penas

Itinerary Redención Procession

RESURRECTION SUNDAY

Jesús Resucitado Procession

Resurrection Sunday  Jumilla

ITINERARY

Rollo Park, Cánovas, Constitución Square, San Roque, Salvador Pérez de los Cobos, Cruces, Calvario, Pasos, ending at Salvador’s Church.

TIMETABLE

Resurrection Sunday at noon, from Rollo Park. Traditional encounter of Resurrected Jesus and the Glorious Virgin, and the later Procession start.
At the end of the procession, it will be carried out the ‘caramelada’.

BROTHERHOODS

  • Cruz Triunfante
  • San Miguel Arcángel
  • Santas Mujeres ante el Sepulcro Vacío
  • Jesús Resucitado
  • San Pedro Apóstol
  • Aparición a la Virgen María
  • Aparición a Santa María Magdalena
  • Aparición de Jesús a los Discípulos de Emaús
  • Aparición de Jesús a Sto. Tomás
  • Aparición de Jesús en el mar de Tiberiades
  • La Virgen Gloriosa

HISTORICAL REVIEW

It was created in 1959 by a group of Easter Week enthusiasts headed by Mr. Jacobo Gónzalez Atienza, inside the San Juan Apostol Brotherhood bosom, for completing the Jumilla’s Easter Week processions’ cycle.
In the Resurrection Sunday morning’s first hours, the ‘tercio de armaos’, belonging to the Brotherhood Cristo Amarrado a la Columna, plays a touching and traditional act: ‘El Caracol’, which previously used to be done in the Holy Saturday evening and that had its origins in the second half of the 19th century.

The Resurrected Lord and his Mother have met between the roar of fireworks and the pigeons’ flight, in front of the pines and palms of the Rollo Park. A cloud of brief gunpowder raises. Then starts the solemn parade of the great and attractive Resurrection Sunday procession; the Angel kneeled, unfolding his wings, raising the Triumphant Cross, in flower; the Resurrected Christ, slender, swinging on his golden throne over maroon flowers; the Holy Women, surprised in front of the empty Sepulchre, with the Angel; the ‘Noil me tangere’ of Christ in front of Magdalene, astonished, trying to proof the physic truth of the Resurrected; in the way to Emaus, on the table with fruits and wine, disciples and Christ, recognised by dividing the bread, standing and the younger friend frightened, awaked his love again, in the old friend; the radiant body of Glorious Christ, under the upright sun, in front of the disbelief and the fear of Tomas; the fish on the enbers, the webs and the breads in Tiberiades, with Lord and the Apostles wearing brocades. Crowd on balconies, pavements, turnings; drums, music band, standards’ and emblems’ shine; colour of embroideries and velvets. The mother comes to the end, transfigured of Glory, under light blue mantle, silvery flowered carriage, between blue and incense. From chairs and balconies, sweets’ rain. Exhaustion and nostalgia at the end of another Easter Week, of another year already fled.

Texto: José Tévar García Itinerary Jesús Resucitado Procession